Academic

Essential Christmas Reading – UWA OPCAT Series

With Christmas just around the corner and the prospect of being incarcerated over the break in close quarters with your loved and perhaps less loved ones (‘you can choose your mates…’) what could be more appealing than some essential reading on the OPCAT to transport you elsewhere?

The University of Western Australia (UWA) has recently published a four-part OPCAT series which has resonance for those of us north of the 49th parallel. While not too heavy to digest, this set of four blogs, give us much to ponder about the OPCAT in the Canadian context.

Kicking off the series, UWA Public Policy Institute Director Shamit Saggar poses the question, ‘can we afford to rely on a complaints-based system?’ In examining the suitability of complaints-focused bodies in the Australian context as it prepares the ground for the implementation of the OPCAT, the writer remarks that “…there is little support for relying on a traditional complaints-approach to the challenge”.

In a paper published earlier this year the Canada OPCAT Project advanced a host of reasons why in the Canadian context a new mechanism should be created for the purposes of OPCAT implementation, primarily due to concerns about the limitations of designating existing ombudsperson-type bodies. Shamit Saggar verbalizes some parallel concerns in the Australian context.

More essential OPCAT reading is provided by Professor Manfred Nowak, who is no stranger in these pages. In a slightly longer contribution, Professor Nowak’s article is aptly titled ‘Australia’s obligations under OPCAT: The challenging task of establishing an effective in a federal state’. Like Canada, Australia is a federal state and as such must institute an NPM in a range of different jurisdictions. In the light of the progress attained in Australia so far, it is the view of this former Special Rapporteur on torture that:

… Australia could become a model for establishing effective NPMs within a federal state structure. The Commonwealth Ombudsman has recently published an excellent and comprehensive baseline study which outlines the variety of places of detention and the extent to which these places are already subject to inspections. This baseline study is intended to serve as basis for states and territories to nominate their respective NPMs.

Manfred Nowak by Phil Strahl (2007)

That being so, Professor Nowak also identifies various risks with the current OPCAT implementation process in Australia, including pertinent questions about the adequate resourcing and overall coordination of the future NPM. Moreover, the current narrow OPCAT approach of the Australian authorities to so-called ‘primary places of detention’ with its exclusion of a whole swathe of potential places of deprivation of liberty Professor Nowak views as especially problematic, and rightly so. A recent article by Laura Grenfell points out why a wider interpretation to OPCAT Article 4 is required in Australia. Nonetheless, as has been argued on several occasions on this website, for Canada there are many lessons which can be drawn from the Australian OPCAT context.

Australian OPCAT enthusiast extraordinaire Steven Caruana offers a refreshingly critical take on the OPCAT implementation process in Australia, despite its noted merits. In an article titled ‘The need for formal partnerships between civil society and the National Preventive Mechanism’ Steven writes the following:

To date, formal civil society participation in the establishment of the NPM and its preventive work has been restricted to consultations with the Australian Human Rights Commission. Substantial engagement with the federal, state and territory governments has been limited. In the case of Western Australia, designation of the Western Australian Ombudsman and Inspector of Custodial Services was made with no public consultation let alone a public announcement.

It is interesting to note that this lack of engagement has not gone unnoticed…

In this excellently succinct article the writer sketches out UN Subcommittee on Prevention of Torture best practice on third section OPCAT consultation as well as civil society’s potential involvement in domestic NPM schemes. In what exact form the Australian model will emerge, it remains to be seen. Yet despite any perceived shortcomings Down Under, it goes without saying that the Australian consultation process is still light years ahead of the virtually non-existent analogue process in Canada.

In a final article in the series, against the backdrop of the Australian Government’s increasingly sceptical position towards what has been termed as “negative globalism”, Holly Cullen cautions how such a sentiment could pose obstacles to the country realising the full potential of an effective implementation of OPCAT in preventing human rights abuses. In doing so, the writer stresses the following key point which ought also to be heeded by the Canadian authorities:

OPCAT is a human rights treaty. Its implementation cannot be treated as a mere technical exercise of identifying existing public bodies and giving them an additional responsibility. NPMs must be adequately resourced, and an appropriate legislative framework will need to be established. 

Sadly, the above business-as-usual approach to OPCAT implementation has been the downfall of many a national OPCAT system.

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is the first installment of your essential reading on the OPCAT this Christmas. All four articles merit a closer reading, while readers with more time on their hands over the holidays may wish to peruse the OPCAT Academics section of the website, where you will find some excellent academic articles on torture prevention. Please tune into these pages over the holidays, as further recommendations will soon follow. Until then dear readers, a very Merry Christmas to you from Ottawa, Canada.

Posted by mp in Academic, Australia, Civil society, Consultation, OPCAT

Introducing… OPCAT Academics

Regular visitors to the Canada OPCAT Project website will be aware that in recent weeks the website has highlighted an ever greater number of articles under the ‘Academic News & Views’ rubric. As the heading suggests, the aim of the post series is to highlight journal articles with a more academic slant on all things OPCAT/torture prevention. In order to make life somewhat easier for visitors to the website, we have corralled them together in a new OPCAT Academics section.

Academics by Ron Mader (2019).

If you have written any materials on the broad subject of torture prevention with an academic twist, please do let us know. The aim of the post series is not to critically review articles, but more to offer a quick overview of their content and publicize them among our ever increasing readership.

Thus, whether you are freshly starting out on your academic path or running a busy, well heeled university law or politics department, we would be delighted to hear from you.  

Consult the OPCAT Academics section here.

Posted by mp in Academic, OPCAT, Torture prevention