A Silence Not Golden – ATIP Request Update

Silence may not always be golden, as the outstanding response to the Canada OPCAT Project’s recent Access to Information & Privacy Request (ATIP) has most positively proven. Global Affairs Canada has regrettably failed to respond to the website within the permitted 75-day deadline.

As a result of the ongoing silence, the Canada OPCAT Project has filed a complaint with the Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada. Established in 1983, this mechanism carries out confidential investigations into complaints about federal institutions’ handling of Access to Information Requests, including in cases of non-response.

To briefly recap, an ATIP Request was submitted to Global Affairs Canada on 23 December 2019 to determine to what extent Canada had acted on a key international recommendation to ensure greater consultation with civil society and Indigenous organizations on the ratification of the OPCAT.

Silence, please – Shawn Rossi (2008)

More frequent visitors to the Canada OPCAT Project website will recall that in its Concluding observations the UN Committee against Torture had recommended in December 2018 that Canada should undertake the following steps:

“Complete the process towards accession to the Optional Protocol to the Convention, while introducing mechanisms to ensure the participation of civil society, indigenous groups and other stakeholders in the entire process.” [§21d]

In the December 2019 ATIP Request to Global Affairs Canada (the lead Federal Department on OPCAT ratification), the Canada OPCAT Project asked for the following information.

“In view of this key United Nations recommendation, please provide copies of any written communications such as letters and emails with Canadian civil society organizations and National Indigenous Organizations on the question of accession by Canada to the Optional Protocol to the UN Convention against Torture since 1 December 2018 to the 21 December 2019.

Please also provide copies of any backgrounders, briefing notes, presentations or other relevant documents for discussion with Canadian civil society organizations and National Indigenous Organizations on the question of Canada acceding to the Optional Protocol to the UN Convention against Torture.”

In late January 2020 Global Affairs Canada responded, stating that it required an additional 45-days to process the request, which, according to the relevant legislation, was due no later than 7 March 2020.

Silence is golden – Lorie Shaull (2015)

Frustratingly, Global Affairs Canada’s continued silence can only be construed as a failure to respond to the initial petition, despite having more than 80 days to process the said request.

Regrettably, today’s complaint was not the first instance when the Canada OPCAT Project has been forced to resort to the Office of the Information Commissioner in order to elicit a response from a Federal Government Department. In 2018 Justice Canada failed to respond to an ATIP Request about the on-going OPCAT consultation process within a similarly extended time period, resulting in the lodging of a complaint with the institution.

The eventual response of Justice Canada to the information request arrived in a highly redacted form, casting a dark shadow over the Canadian authorities’ genuine commitment to an open and transparent OPCAT consultation process. The paucity of information since shared by any federal agency on this important human rights issue, including by Global Affairs Canada, has only reinforced this highly disappointing impression.

We can only hope that the final response from Global Affairs Canada will be worth the long wait.


Read more about the Canada OPCAT Project’s ATIP Request from December 2019 and the initial response from Global Affairs Canada from January 2020.

See Justice Canada’s highly redacted response to the website’s 2018 ATIP Request and read what we found out about the OPCAT consultation process.