75 Is Not A Lucky Number – Global Affairs Canada’s ATIP Response

Earlier this week the Canada OPCAT Project received an initial response from Global Affairs Canada concerning its latest Access to Information request. A response of sorts perhaps!

To quickly recap, the Canada OPCAT Project filed an Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) request on 23 December 2019 requesting information from Global Affairs Canada about the scope of its supposedly ongoing OPCAT ratification consultation process with Canadian civil society and Indigenous groups throughout 2019. You can find out more here.

During its examination by the UN Committee against Torture in Geneva in November 2018 Canada stated publicly that it would endeavor to consult with Canadian civil society on the important human rights topic of OPCAT ratification.

Alan Levine, Open or Closed (2012).

In an official response dated 13 January 2020 the Canada OPCAT Project was informed the following:

“In accordance with paragraph 9(1)(a) of the Act [Access to Information Act], an extension of up to 45 days beyond the original statutory limit is required since meeting the original time limit would unreasonably interfere with the operations of the Department.”

In a nutshell, Global Affairs Canada has given itself up to 75 days (the initial 30 + 45 additional days) to respond to the above request about Canada’s OPCAT consultation process. Let us be clear – 75 days is a more than a fifth of a year!

How might one interpret this seemingly 75-day hesitancy?

  • Global Affairs Canada is exceedingly busy;
  • The department is under-staffed;
  • Global Affairs Canada has an abundance of OPCAT consultation-related information to sift through and possibly redact in order to fully respond to the information request;
  • ATIP requests are generally low on the department’s list of priorities, but it will comply with the law by requesting a 75-day response time;
  • Or possibly a mixture of all of the above.

Readers can make their own minds up, but we would tend to shift towards the lower end of the list.

Alan Levine, Sorry We Are Not Open (2012)

If an uncomfortable truth be told, if Global Affairs Canada as the lead agency on the OPCAT just occasionally provided updates about Canada’s OPCAT ratification process, recourse to Access to Information legislation would not be necessary.

After over 18-months of operation and after publishing 120-odd different articles, the Canada OPCAT Project has not been in a position to publish a single news item about the ratification of the OPCAT in Canada based on information unilaterally and voluntarily placed into the public domain by a department of the Canadian Government, such has been the absolute paucity of publicly available information.

If the Canadian Government is willing to place on public record that the ‘Optional Protocol is no longer optional for Canada‘, then it should not be surprised that actors remain committed to holding it to its word.

Please return in mid-March 2020, dear readers, for Global Affairs Canada’s full ATIP response.


Read how the OPCAT might be instituted in Canada.

Find out more about the December 2019 ATIP request.